Choreographing time: animation without a screen

Last night I was really impressed by Choreographing time: animation without a screen, a presentation of the Diasynchronoscope project by Trope at Goldsmith’s Thursday club at the Centre for Recent Collaboration.

Carol MacGillivray and Bruno Mathez, who collaborate together as Trope, showed their amazing screen-less animation and explained how it had emerged from experiments with perception, animation, physical computing, digital composition, sculpture and sleight of hand. I had previously seen their work Gaffer at Tenderpixel Gallery in which objects literally seemed to fly around the room.

As the work is site specific and relies on clever optical illusions it is almost impossible to photograph, but here is a video of their work.

Trope presents… from Trope on Vimeo.

Choreographing time: animation without a screen

Ephemeral Animation: Nenagh Watson

Nenagh Watson is a puppeteer currently researching into what she calls ephemeral animation. She is fascinated by objects that move without human control at the mercy of the elements. Consider the following umbrellas as they are carried by the wind. Their movement is created by natural forces rather than the hands of a puppeteer. Watson uses this motion to inspire works of puppetry:

Observing umbrellas, as well as her earlier work with Polish theatre director Tadeusz Kantor (whom she describes as having said that the umbrella’s metal skeleton explodes like fireworks) inspired Conversations with an Umbrella, a collaboration between Nenagh Watson and sound artist Kaffe Matthews.

Umbrellas, plastic bags, pieces of rope… all discarded items of human debris that fly in the wind or float in the water. From Watson’s Duchampian notion of ‘found’ movement that has been created by chance, she examines moments of tension and freedom, stillness and motion and uses these to inform her work in puppetry. She says her eyes have become opened to the world of random movement around her. For Watson, this is all part of making herself and her presence obsolete in the work, in striving to be without ego.

In her Plastic Bag Labyrinth, shown below, she uses her observation of how air fills discarded carrier bags to create an installation in which the bags are caused to move through the actions of visitors to the installation.

For more information about her working practices, see a review of Nenagh Watson’s Ephemeral Animation workshop at the Central School of Speech and Drama and another account of an earlier workshop.

This post was written in response to her presentation at the Talking Objects Symposium at Loughborough University on 9th March 2012.

Ephemeral Animation: Nenagh Watson

Mat Collishaw, Throbbing Gristle, 2008

Mat Collishaw’s show Shooting Stars at the Haunch of Venison in 2008 explored the legacy of Victorian imaging technology in our parallel era of rapid technological development. The most powerful presence in the show was Collishaw’s contemporary zoetrope, Throbbing Gristle, featuring small  characters created through rapid prototyping that appeared to come to life under the flickering lights of the gallery.

Mat Collishaw, Throbbing Gristle, 2008